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VETERINARY FAQ​

What kind of pictures should you post in the feed?

  • Clear well-lit pictures of the case.

  • Zoom or close-up pictures can be useful to better show the problem.

  • Pictures of scans, imaging results, slides, test results and printouts can be very interesting and are encouraged.

  • Make sure to keep your phone very still for best quality pictures and make sure it’s in focus.

  • You can upload up to three pictures to best show your case.

 

What kind of pictures should not be posted in the feed?

  • Any picture depicting any intentional cruelty to an animal by you.

  • Pictures of healthy animals unless it is a follow-up on a case.

  • Pictures that easily identify animal owners.

  • If you see what you deem to be an inappropriate picture, please click on ‘Inappropriate’. We’ll investigate and remove it if we agree.

 

How will I know if comments are valid and worth considering?

  • One way is to look at how many others agree with the comment by the number of upvotes it has received

  • Look at the commenter’s profile and note how many people follow him/her or like their posts.

  • Comments are just other opinions and should be taken as such. There is often no one right answer to animal health questions and considering many opinions is a great way to support your practice.

How quickly will I get comments from colleagues?

  • A great thing about TapVet is how quickly the professional community is ready to comment and share.

 

How is TapVet unique and the best daily support resource for veterinary professionals and students?

  • Multiple opinions or crowd-advice is very powerful in veterinary medicine where there is often not a single interpretation of the problem. More opinions mean better outcomes.

  • It is a place for you to share your experience and knowledge to help colleagues. If you have a valid comment to make, don’t hesitate to contribute! This is the essence of TapVet.

  • You may receive comments on your posts very quickly eliminating having to wait for days for a specific response.

  • TapVet contributions are current while research results can often be outdated.

  • When working alone or in a small team, additional opinions and interpretations can be invaluable.

  • It’s a place to learn and see interesting and sometimes unique cases.

  • Drawing on the experience of many can more easily support interpreting rare cases.

  • The community will comment specifically on your case. You don’t have to guess if your case is the same as others.

  • It can be used to educate.

  • It’s a totally free resource. All we ask is that you occasionally comment on a few anonymous posts from us or consumers.

VETERINARY FAQ​